Category Archives: Washington Redskins

IN A NEW YORK MINUTE

IN A NEW YORK MINUTE
BY John Tully
THE LOS ANGELES SUN

JUNE 17 2004

Being a vocal, loyal fan of the Redskins, Bullets and Redsox at an upstate New York boarding school didn’t go over too well with the lads. He hated their teams right back, as any good D.C.- loving boy would but he was badly outnumbered. The Big Apple’s teams and in turn, the city had been his nemesis for years and moving to the coast only strengthened that rivalry.

He used to fly People Express in and out of Newark and it was hell. The bus to Port Authority and the cruise to Canal Street was always a fun adventure but he had absolutely revelled in not being a Newyorker.

Seventeen years and a minute later he fell hard.

MISTA? Hello?!
Can you blame him?
Every polish waitress, every Ecuadorian launderer,
Indian Cabdriver, downtown hipster, bodega owner and Yankee Stadium attendee treated him like a king.

Gettheheckouta’ere!
What gives?

The smell of burnt pretzels and Sabrett hot dogs with cars whizzing/honking by; a beautiful day in Central Park and the sun going down right exactly over the West Village. Thirty Irish bars in ten square blocks, thousands of great restaurants and a subway that works.

He gave in.

Seventeen years later he fell in love with a city that never sleeps and it was all over. But it wasn’t until he flew back to the coast that evening that he choked-up when he figured it out:
this was a truly great town that had been attacked; it’s heart broken just two and a half years before.

Just when he had lost faith in pretty much all of mankind, this good, noble, wounded yet resilient city had given him some hope that America could still be great.

The beautiful woman didn’t hurt either.

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In a New York Minute

IN A NEW YORK MINUTE
BY John Tully
THE LOS ANGELES SUN
BBRIDGE

JUNE 17 2004

Being a vocal, loyal fan of the Redskins, Bullets and Redsox at an upstate New York boarding school didn’t go over too well with the lads. He hated their teams right back, as any good D.C.- loving boy would but he was badly outnumbered. The Big Apple’s teams and in turn, the City, had been his nemesis for years and moving to the coast only strengthened that rivalry.

He used to fly People Express in and out of Newark and it was hell. The bus to Port Authority and the cruise to Canal Street was always a fun adventure but he had absolutely revelled in not being a Newyorker.

Seventeen years and a minute later he fell hard.

MISTA? Hello?!
Can you blame him?
Every polish waitress, every Ecuadorian launderer,
Indian Cabdriver, downtown hipster, bodega owner and Yankee Stadium attendee treated him like a king.

Gettheheckouta’ere!
What gives?

The smell of burnt pretzels and Sabrett hot dogs with cars whizzing/honking by; a beautiful day in Central Park and the sun going down right exactly over the West Village. Thirty Irish bars in ten square blocks, thousands of great restaurants and a subway that works.

He gave in.

Seventeen years later he fell in love with a city that never sleeps and it was all over. But it wasn’t until he flew back to the coast that evening that he choked-up when he figured it out:
this was a truly great town that had been attacked; it’s heart broken just two and a half years before.

Just when he had lost faith in pretty much all of mankind, this good, noble, wounded yet resilient city had given him some hope that America could still be great.

The beautiful woman didn’t hurt either.

More TV Blackouts This Year in the N.F.L.

September 2, 2009
33-50218-F

T.V. Blackouts Possible for N.F.L.

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

Reduced season-ticket sales for some N.F.L. teams could result in a greater than usual number of local television blackouts.

“It’s all part of the challenges that we’re seeing in the economy and what our clubs are going through,” Roger Goodell told reporters Tuesday at the Washington Redskins’ training camp in Ashburn, Va. “Our clubs have been working hard in the off-season to create other ways to try to get people in the stadiums and to have policies that are a little more flexible, and hopefully, they’re going to pay dividends for us.”

He said that the Jacksonville Jaguars, whose season tickets have fallen to 25,000 this season from 42,000 last season, were one of the teams whose games could be blacked out if their home games are not sold out.

N.F.L. rules require that games be blacked out in local markets if they are not sold out 72 hours before kickoff.

A USA Today survey found that the fans of a dozen teams might face some blackouts this season.

CBS and Fox said they did not expect the blackouts to significantly affect ratings or cause them to provide givebacks to advertisers.

“Very simply, it’s about the overall ratings,” Ed Goren, the president of Fox Sports, wrote in an e-mail message. “A few blackouts may not have any real effect on our full-season ratings.”

LeslieAnne Wade, a spokeswoman for CBS Sports, said, “It won’t be in every market, so we don’t expect blackouts to affect the rating we’re selling for national advertising.

Dan Snyder and The 'Skins Get Fatboy Albert Haynesworth in Quick Free Agent Move

(Feb. 27)

Moving swiftly in the first hours of free agency, the Washington Redskins opened their deep pockets and snagged the biggest name available: Albert Haynesworth.

Washington Redskins Decide to Start Playing Football in Exciting Win Over Saints















SF GATE DOT COM

In his attempt to redesign the Washington Redskins’ offense, rookie coach Jim Zorn has constantly peppered Jason Campbell with all sorts of phrases. One of them: “Avoid, reset and throw.”

After a miserable first game, Campbell last week responded with a phrase of his own: “Coach, just trust me.”

On Sunday, both got the point. Campbell went from uncomfortable to prolific with a 321-yard passing day, and he mastered the “avoid, reset and throw” move with aplomb on a 67-yard touchdown to Santana Moss as the Redskins came from behind to beat visiting New Orleans 29-24.

“We talked a lot during the week,” Campbell said. “I said ‘Coach, just trust me.’ And he said, ‘I’ve got to trust you more.’ We do it together.”

Campbell appeared out of sorts with Zorn’s West Coast attack in a 16-7 loss to the Giants, but he went 24-for-36 with no interceptions against the Saints. He completed his last eight passes as the Redskins (1-1) overcame a nine-point deficit with two touchdowns in the final 6 1/2 minutes.

“I don’t really know how to act, but I am very excited,” Zorn said of his first NFL win. “I wish I could enjoy it as much as I had to endure last week for four or five days, but I won’t be able to.”

The big play came with 3:29 left and the Redskins trailing 24-22. Campbell avoided the rush, stepped forward and hit Moss in stride, the receiver one step ahead of rookie cornerback Tracy Porter.

Reggie Bush returned a punt 55 yards for a touchdown that gave the Saints (1-1) a 24-15 lead at the end of the third quarter. New Orleans remained in the game principally because all five of the Redskins’ first-half drives ended in field-goal attempts.

The Saints committed three turnovers, and all landed in the hands of seventh-round draft pick Chris Horton.