Howard Stern Will Host America's Got Talent

Howard Stern

by John Tully

The New York Herald Sun

December 15, 2011

New York City

It’s official: Howard Stern will be the new host of America’s Got Talent.

The longtime radio host announced it this morning on his show at approximately 8:20 am along with his agent Don Buchwald.

Stern will replace Piers Morgan, who quit the variety/talent show in order to concentrate on his CNN interview program.

The show reunites Mr. Stern with his former employer, NBC who he worked for in the mid-eighties and was inelegantly fired from when the radio station and O and O property WNBC decided the King of All Media was too controversial for it’s airwaves.

“Believe me – I didn’t do it for the money” he told Access Hollywood.

Howard Stern Reiterates on Piers Morgan's New Show That Jay Leno is a Thief

Howard Stern

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Calls him a “crook” who “steals” jokes; “He’s not fit to scrub David Letterman’s feet”

In his interview on CNN’s Piers Morgan Tonight (airing Tuesday), Howard Stern goes after Jay Leno, accusing the NBC Tonight Show host of stealing jokes.

“Jay is insane. And Jay is a crook,” Stern tells Morgan, according to the New York Post. “And the world knows exactly what he’s up to. He steals a tremendous amount of material.
“He’s not fit to scrub David Letterman‘s feet,” he goes on. “I don’t know how he’s beaten David Letterman in the ratings. It’s beyond my comprehension. America must be filled with morons who at night lay in bed — the ones who are watching him, they must be in a coma.”
Stern has long accused Leno of stealing sketch ideas.
In 2009, he said Leno copied his idea of inviting a chicken to predict football wins for the following week.
“This must be a giant ‘Punk’d’ on me,” Stern said at the time. “This guy’s ripped off like ten major things from my show. But the chicken thing we did for years.”

High Fructose Corn Syrup Trying To Change Name To "Corn Sugar"

High Fructose Corn Syrup

NEW YORK – The makers of high fructose corn syrup want to sweeten its image with a new name: corn sugar.

The Corn Refiners Association applied Tuesday to the federal government for permission to use the name on food labels. The group hopes a new name will ease confusion about the sweetener, which is used in soft drinks, bread, cereal and other products.

Americans’ consumption of corn syrup has fallen to a 20-year low on consumer concerns that it is more harmful or more likely to cause obesity than ordinary sugar, perceptions for which there is little scientific evidence.

However, some scientists have linked consumption of full-calorie soda — the vast majority of which is sweetened with high fructose corn syrup — to obesity.


There’s a new online marketing campaign at http://www.cornsugar.com and on television. Two new commercials try to alleviate shopper confusion, showing people who say they now understand that “whether it’s corn sugar or cane sugar, your body can’t tell the difference. Sugar is sugar.”

Renaming products has succeeded before. For example, low eurcic acid rapeseed oil became much more popular after becoming “canola oil” in 1988. Prunes tried to shed a stodgy image by becoming “dried plums” in 2000.

The new name would help people understand the sweetener, said Audrae Erickson, president of the Washington-based group.

“It has been highly disparaged and highly misunderstood,” she said. She declined to say how much the campaign costs.

Sugar and high fructose corn syrup are nutritionally the same, and there’s no evidence that the sweetener is any worse for the body than sugar, said Michael Jacobson, executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. The bottom line is people should consume less of all sugars, Jacobson said.

“Soda pop sweetened with sugar is every bit as conducive to obesity as soda pop sweetened with high fructose corn syrup,” he said.

The American Medical Association says there’s not enough evidence yet to restrict the use of high fructose corn syrup, although it wants more research.

Still, Americans increasingly are blaming high fructose corn syrup and avoiding it. First lady Michelle Obama has said she does not want her daughters eating it.

Parents such as Joan Leib scan ingredient labels and will not buy anything with it. The mother of two in Somerville, Mass., has been avoiding the sweetener for about a year to reduce sweeteners in her family’s diet.

“I found it in things that you would never think needed it, or should have it,” said Leib, 36. “I found it in jars of pickles, in English muffins and bread. Why do we need extra sweeteners?”

Many companies are responding by removing it from their products. Last month, Sara Lee switched to sugar in two of its breads. Gatorade, Snapple and Hunt’s Ketchup very publicly switched to sugar in the past two years.

The average American ate 35.7 pounds of high fructose corn syrup last year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That’s down 21 percent from 45.4 pounds 10 years before.

Cane and beet sugar, meanwhile, have hovered around 44 pounds per person per year since the mid-1980s, after falling rapidly in the 1970s, when high fructose corn syrup — a cheaper alternative to sugar — gained favor with soft drink makers.

With sales falling in the U.S., the industry is growing in emerging markets like Mexico, and revenue has been steady at $3 billion to $4 billion a year, said Credit Suisse senior analyst Robert Moskow. There are five manufacturers in the U.S.: Archer Daniels Midland Inc., Corn Products International, Cargill, Roquette America, and Tate & Lyle.

Corn refiners say their new name better describes the sweetener.

“The name ‘corn sugar’ more accurately reflects the source of the food (corn), identifies the basic nature of the food (a sugar), and discloses the food’s function (a sweetener),” the petition said.

Will shoppers swallow the new name?

The public is skeptical, so the move will be met with criticism, said Tim Calkins, a marketing professor at Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

“This isn’t all that much different from any of the negative brands trying to embrace new brand names,” he said, adding the change is similar to what ValuJet — whose name was tarnished by a deadly crash in 1996 — did when it bought AirTran’s fleet and took on its name.

“They’re not saying this is a healthy vitamin, or health product,” he said. “They’re just trying to move away from the negative associations.”

Mr. Rove's Wild Ride

Ari Fleisher, Atta, Bababooey, Baghdad, Balackwater USA, Barack Obama, Bechtel, Bill Kristol, Broadcatching, Bush Doctrine, Carlyle Group, Charles Krauthammer, Contractors, Dan Senor, Dick Cheney, Douglas Feith, Elliot Abrams, George W. Bush, George Will, GOP, Haditha, Halliburton, Iran, Iraq, Irving Kristol, Joe Biden, John McCain, John Tully, Joseph Wilson, Karl Rove, Kellog Brown and Root, Patraeus, Paul Bremer, Paul Wolfowitz, PNAC, Ramadi, Republican, Richard Perle, Rove+Poerpoint, Sarah Palin, Scott McCllelan, Security Council, Sen. Robert Byrd, Shinseki, Tom Daschle, Valerie Plame, War On Terrorism

BY John Tully
October 8 2002
The Los Angeles Sun

Politics is not a pretty thing.

Look no further than this week in Washington D. C. Former Vice-president Albert Gore Jr. finally brought up the huge marsupial in the room. Criminy! folks, that’s gonna’ wake the whole herd up mate!

Senate Leader Tom Daschle, who seemed to have stashed his opinions in a lock box this summer finally blew his top on the Senate floor denouncing President Bush’s comment at a recent fundraiser that the “Senate” is more interested in “special interests” than in the Security Of Americans. That very same fundraiser pushed the President past Bill Clinton’s record of $126 million raised in one year and it’s only the last week of September.

Stepping right up to the plate this week was a small group of Senators who have been all too quiet this summer with any dissent of this administration’s dual War On Terrorism and Iraq. In fact the debate on war had bipassed “if” and went straight through to “when” and “who’s with us” by the time Mr. Gore finally cleared his throat Monday in San Francisco. Actual questions were raised about our effectiveness in toppling Saddam and how to proceed post-war in Iraq among others.

Sen. Robert Byrd paced and shook with disdain as he read Bush’s remarks from the newspaper on the senate floor. Sen. Daschle’s voice broke as he defended his colleagues, spoke of members who have served in the military and demanded an apology from the President. He also spoke of not politicizing the nation’s debate. It was a classic case of “too little,too late”

Back in June an internal G.O.P. playbook, authored by White House political strategist Karl Rove got into the hands of the opposition. The Powerpoint presentation suggested Republican candidates play up the “War” to keep the political dialogue on their side of the fence.The relative silence of the Democrats this summer only strengthened the resolve of the true hawks in the administration and a bipartisan resolution for war will almost definitely be passed by both houses. For GOP candidates however, the strategy might not pay off.

A new poll released this week shows that while the majority of Americans are for action against Iraq, three out of five want our allies to sign on. Colin Powell would like to go back to the Security Council soon with a joint resolution from the United States Congress and it looks as if he will have it. Unfortunately for the Republicans, this momentary truce focuses the debate back onto the domestic front where, as usual, it is the Economy…stupid.

Crikey! The bugger just ate his own heed!

Politics is not a pretty creature.

© 2002 The Los Angeles Sun

Sulu Gets Married as Uhura and Chekov Look On

Stories

Toast the groom (and the other groom) with a tall mug of Romulan ale! George Takei of “Star Trek” fame tied the knot in Los Angeles on Sunday and People magazine was all over it like Captain Kirk on that green alien lady.

George Takei and his longtime partner, Brad Altman, were wed Sunday evening in a Buddhist ceremony in downtown Los Angeles.

“All I can remember is what the priest said,” Takei told People after the ceremony. “That this moment will never happen again. It’s something to savor.”

Nearly 200 of the couple’s friends attended the event, which began as a kimono-clad koto player plucked out tunes on the ancient Japanese stringed instrument. Afterward, the couple sipped sake from red lacquer cups, then said their vows to one another while standing within a circle of yellow rose petals.

A Scottish bagpiper led Takei, 71, and Altman, 54, to the reception on the grounds of the Japanese American National Museum. On the way, the couple, along with their maid of honor and best man (Takei’s former “Star Trek” costars Nichelle Nichols and Walter Koenig) flashed the “live long and prosper” hand sign to photographers and friends.

“I was fighting back the tears,” said Nichols, who played Uhura on the “Star Trek” series. “But they came oozing out anyway. I’m so happy that they’re both able to legally proclaim their commitment to one another after spending the past 21 years together.”

In May, Takei announced his plans to wed after California’s Supreme Court allowed gay marriage under the state’s Constitution.

Wait, does this mean Mr. Sulu is gay? Set red-state phasers on stunned!

But seriously, best wishes for Takei and Altman, and we hope didn’t get too many of these as wedding gifts.

— Geoff Boucher

LOS ANGELES TIMES BLOG